Posts tagged daikon

Vegan Dumpster Radish Kimchi

I am horrible at keeping up with posting. Someday I will be a disciplined blogger. Of course, judging by the large gaps between my “Coming Soon!” post and when I actually write the post, that day may be a long time coming. I never said I was perfect.

Anyway, once upon a time I briefly dated a Korean girl. By briefly I mean one month and during this month I had a constant supply of her mom’s homemade radish kimchi in my fridge. It was a really good month. Then I screwed up and I’m pretty sure she still hates me and I definitely still miss that kimchi.

Cabbage kimchi is … good. But, radish kimchi is the shit. The texture of the daikon, crisp yet a little soft; lots of heat yet cold; the red pepper and the green onions. Pretty much perfect.

After a Food Not Bombs cooking night I had a ton of daikon and Jerusalem artichokes on my hands. I had to make kimchi even though I knew I didn’t have all the right stuff. Whatever, I had to make kimchi.

You’re supposed to use:

  • daikon
  • garlic
  • ginger
  • fish sauce (use soy sauce or mushroom sauce)
  • sugar
  • red pepper powder
  • green onions
  • salt

This is what I had:

  • daikon
  • garlic
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • soy sauce
  • sugar
  • paprika and red pepper flakes
  • arugula (which I picked out of a bag of dumpstered salad mix)
  • salt

I cubed the daikon, covered with salt, and let it set while prepared the other ingredients. Jerusalem artichokes may look a lot like ginger, but there are no flavor similarities. I minced it like ginger anyway and used a lot since I had a ton and they have such a mild flavor.

I rinsed the daikon and mixed everything together in a bowl. Korean red pepper powder is NOT the same thing as red pepper flakes (like you put on pizza). Red pepper flakes come from cayenne peppers which means they’re pretty hot. I used the paprika, which is quite mild, and added a little bit of red pepper flakes to add some heat.

Pre-fermentation:

I covered it with an inverted plate and plastic wrap and let it sit unrefrigerated for 24 hours to ferment. Then I put it in small containers and put them in the fridge. It didn’t even compare to REAL kimchi, but it was good enough considering what I was working with.

Here’s one of the recipes (with nice photos) that I referenced when making my janky kimchi.

Post-fermentation:

Dumpster Kimchi

And that’s the story of how I made the world’s jankiest radish kimchi.

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